They’re slightly different from the original version.

BY EMILIA BENTON

RGSTUDIOGETTY IMAGES

We know, we know. Just as vaccines became widely available and we thought we were seeing light at the end of the Covid-19 pandemic tunnel, the Omicron variant reared its ugly head. It seems like everybody and their mother is testing positive, despite being vaccinated, almost like it’s a matter of when, not if, you’ll be the next one to get infected.

Even though the Omicron variant is running rampant and proving to be even more contagious than previous variants and strains, the good news is that infections are mostly looking to be far less severe in people who are vaccinated, also making for less hospitalizations. Still, we don’t blame you if you want to be smart and still do your best to avoid becoming infected at all. As such, we consulted with a physician about what Omicron Covid-19 symptoms to watch for to stay healthy.

As mentioned, the Omicron variant is causing much milder symptoms than the original Covid strain and the Delta variant, which is good news, says Suneet Singh, MD, an emergency room physician and medical director of CareHive Health in Austin, Texas.

The classic symptoms of the earlier strains were: cough, fever, and intense muscle aches, as well as the loss of taste or smell. In very severe cases, chest pressure, as well as shortness of breath, were also prominent symptoms.

Given we know the classic Covid-19 symptoms, let’s break down just how different the Omicron variant is as far as symptoms, and how to know if you have it.

What exactly are the main and lesser-known symptoms of the Omicron variant?

Aside from classic Covid-19 symptoms, according to Dr. Singh, some of the distinguishing symptoms of the Omicron variant are:

  • runny nose
  • stuffy nose
  • sore throat

“Omicron, [meanwhile,] is less likely to invade the lungs,” Dr. Singh says. “Instead, Omicron is causing more upper respiratory symptoms.”

Omicron is not known to result in a loss of taste or smell, unlike the other variants, Dr. Singh continues. However, because the symptoms of Omicron are less severe, it can be hard to differentiate it from other causes of upper respiratory conditions like seasonal allergies. (Because it wasn’t already challenging enough to determine if it’s a cold or Covid, right?)

If you do have symptoms such as a runny or stuffy nose, sore throat, cough, and/or fever, it is very important to get tested as soon as possible and stay at home while you wait for your results, Dr. Singh says.

What should I do if I catch it?

If you test positive for Covid-19, no matter the variant, it’s important to consult with your doctor about the best treatment path forward for you as an individual, Dr. Singh says. You can safely do this with a virtual visit to limit your exposure to others while you’re sick. Not only is this more convenient than unnecessarily heading to the ER or urgent care, it’s also likely going to be far cheaper.

“During this visit, you may be prescribed one of the two new anti-Covid medications that recently became available on the market earlier this year,” he explains. “Your team will also work with you to determine if you are a candidate for monoclonal antibody therapy.”

In any case, if you have Covid, be sure to get plenty of rest, hydrate well, and use over-the-counter medications such as throat lozenges, pain relievers like ibuprofen, and fever-lowering medications like acetaminophen, or Tylenol, he adds.

How can I protect myself from Omicron?

Without a doubt, the best means of protection against Covid altogether is to get vaccinated (that is, a full series and their recommended booster) if you haven’t already, he says.

“In addition to vaccination, social distancing remains an important part of protection from Omicron,” he adds. “If possible, try to maintain a safe distance of at least six feet apart from others, minimizing physical contact and wearing an appropriately fitting mask to reduce the risk of [getting] Covid.”

Additionally, if you are going to still gather with others, especially with anyone at high risk of Covid-related complications, it’s also important to get tested within 48 hours of the event. This is key for detecting an infection while you may be symptomatic, Dr. Singh says.

“A PCR test is considered the gold-standard test to detect all variants of COVID, including Omicron,” he says. “Antigen [or rapid] tests are also useful to detect disease, but they are known to be less sensitive. Ideally, a negative antigen test result should be followed by a PCR test for a definitive answer. If either a PCR or antigen test is positive, then you are actively infected with the disease.”

The bottom line: While you can rest easily knowing that becoming infected with Omicron is likely to be less severe if you’re vaccinated, continue to do your best to avoid becoming infected altogether. And it can’t be said enough: If you still haven’t gotten vaccinated, schedule your appointment to do so today.

From the CDC

Quarantine

 If you were exposed

Quarantine and stay away from others when you have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19.lungs virus light icon

Isolate

If you are sick or test positive

Isolate when you are sick or when you have COVID-19, even if you don’t have symptoms.

When to Stay Home

Calculating Quarantine

The date of your exposure is considered day 0. Day 1 is the first full day after your last contact with a person who has had COVID-19. Stay home and away from other people for at least 5 days. Learn why CDC updated guidance for the general public.

IF YOU
Were exposed to COVID-19 and are NOT up-to-date on COVID-19 vaccinations

Quarantine for at least 5 days

Stay home
Stay home and quarantine for at least 5 full days.

Wear a well-fitted mask if you must be around others in your home.

Get tested
Even if you don’t develop symptoms, get tested at least 5 days after you last had close contact with someone with COVID-19.

After quarantine

Watch for symptoms
Watch for symptoms until 10 days after you last had close contact with someone with COVID-19.

If you develop symptoms
Isolate immediately and get tested. Continue to stay home until you know the results. Wear a well-fitted mask around others.

Take precautions until day 10

Wear a mask
Wear a well-fitted mask for 10 full days any time you are around others inside your home or in public. Do not go to places where you are unable to wear a mask.

Avoid travel

Avoid being around people who are at high risk

IF YOU
Were exposed to COVID-19 and are up-to-date on COVID-19 vaccinations

No quarantine
You do not need to stay home unless you develop symptoms.

Get tested
Even if you don’t develop symptoms, get tested at least 5 days after you last had close contact with someone with COVID-19.

Watch for symptoms
Watch for symptoms until 10 days after you  last had close contact with someone with COVID-19.

If you develop symptoms
Isolate immediately and get tested. Continue to stay home until you know the results. Wear a well-fitted mask around others.

Take precautions until day 10

Wear a mask
Wear a well-fitted mask for 10 full days any time you are around others inside your home or in public. Do not go to places where you are unable to wear a mask.

Avoid travel

Avoid being around people who are at high risk

IF YOU
were exposed to COVID-19 and had confirmed COVID-19 within the past 90 days (you tested positive using a viral test)

No quarantine
You do not need to stay home unless you develop symptoms.

Watch for symptoms
Watch for symptoms until 10 days after you  last had close contact with someone with COVID-19.

 If you develop symptoms
Isolate immediately and get tested. Continue to stay home until you know the results. Wear a well-fitted mask around others.

Take precautions until day 10

Wear a mask
Wear a well-fitted mask for 10 full days any time you are around others inside your home or in public. Do not go to places where you are unable to wear a mask.

Avoid travel

Avoid being around people who are at high riskCalculating Isolation

Day 0 is your first day of symptoms or a positive viral test. Day 1 is the first full day after your symptoms developed or your test specimen was collected. If you have COVID-19 or have symptoms, isolate for at least 5 days.

IF YOU
Tested positive for COVID-19 or have symptoms, regardless of vaccination status

Stay home for at least 5 days
Stay home for 5 days and isolate from others in your home.

Wear a well-fitted mask if you must be around others in your home.

Ending isolation if you had symptoms
End isolation after 5 full days if you are fever-free for 24 hours (without the use of fever-reducing medication) and your symptoms are improving.

Ending isolation if you did NOT have symptoms
End isolation after at least 5 full days after your positive test.

If you were severely ill with COVID-19
You should isolate for at least 10 days. Consult your doctor before ending isolation.

Take precautions until day 10

Wear a mask 
Wear a well-fitted mask for 10 full days any time you are around others inside your home or in public. Do not go to places where you are unable to wear a mask.

Avoid travel

Avoid being around people who are at high riskDEFINITIONS

Exposure

Contact with someone infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in a way that increases the likelihood of getting infected with the virus.

Close Contact

Close contacts are someone who was less than 6 feet away from an infected person (laboratory-confirmed or a clinical diagnosis) for a cumulative total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period. For example, three individual 5-minute exposures for a total of 15 minutes.

Quarantine

Quarantine is a strategy used to prevent transmission of COVID-19 by keeping people who have been in close contact with someone with COVID-19 apart from others.

Who does not need to quarantine?

If you had close contact with someone with COVID-19 and you are in one of the following groups, you do not need to quarantine.

  • You are up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines.
  • You had confirmed COVID-19 within the last 90 days (meaning you tested positive using a viral test).

And you should wear a well-fitting mask around others for 10 days from the date of your last close contact with someone with COVID-19 (the date of last close contact is considered day 0). Get tested at least 5 days after you last had close contact with someone with COVID-19. If you test positive or develop COVID-19 symptoms, isolate from other people and follow recommendations in the Isolation section below. If you tested positive for COVID-19 with a viral test within the previous 90 days and subsequently recovered and remain without COVID-19 symptoms, you do not need to quarantine or get tested after close contact. You should wear a well-fitting mask around others for 10 days from the date of your last close contact with someone with COVID-19 (the date of last close contact is considered day 0).

Who should quarantine?

If you come into close contact with someone with COVID-19, you should quarantine if you are not up to date on COVID-19 vaccines. This includes people who are not vaccinated.

What to do for quarantine

  • Stay home and away from other people for at least 5 days (day 0 through day 5) after your last contact with a person who has COVID-19. The date of your exposure is considered day 0. Wear a well-fitting mask when around others at home, if possible.
  • For 10 days after your last close contact with someone with COVID-19, watch for fever (100.4◦F or greater), cough, shortness of breath, or other COVID-19 symptoms .
  • If you develop symptoms, get tested immediately and isolate until you receive your test results. If you test positive, follow isolation recommendations.
  • If you do not develop symptoms, get tested at least 5 days after you last had close contact with someone with COVID-19.
    • If you test negative, you can leave your home, but continue to wear a well-fitting mask when around others at home and in public until 10 days after your last close contact with someone with COVID-19.
    • If you test positive, you should isolate for at least 5 days from the date of your positive test (if you do not have symptoms). If you do develop COVID-19 symptoms, isolate for at least 5 days from the date your symptoms began (the date the symptoms started is day 0). Follow recommendations in the isolation section below.
    • If you are unable to get a test 5 days after last close contact with someone with COVID-19, you can leave your home after day 5 if you have been without COVID-19 symptoms throughout the 5-day period. Wear a well-fitting mask for 10 days after your date of last close contact when around others at home and in public.
    • Avoid people who are immunocompromised or at high risk for severe disease, and nursing homes and other high-risk settings, until after at least 10 days.
  • If possible, stay away from people you live with, especially people who are at higher risk for getting very sick from COVID-19, as well as others outside your home throughout the full 10 days after your last close contact with someone with COVID-19.
  • If you are unable to quarantine, you should wear a well-fitting mask for 10 days when around others at home and in public.
  • If you are unable to wear a mask when around others, you should continue to quarantine for 10 days. Avoid people who are immunocompromised or at high risk for severe disease, and nursing homes and other high-risk settings, until after at least 10 days.
  • Do not travel during your 5-day quarantine period. Get tested at least 5 days after your last close contact and make sure your test result is negative and you remain without symptoms before traveling. If you don’t get tested, delay travel until 10 days after your last close contact with a person with COVID-19. If you must travel before the 10 days are completed, wear a well-fitting mask when you are around others for the entire duration of travel during the 10 days. If you are unable to wear a mask, you should not travel during the 10 days.
  • Do not go to places where you are unable to wear a mask, such as restaurants and some gyms, and avoid eating around others at home and at work until after 10 days after your last close contact with someone with COVID-19.

After quarantine

  • Watch for symptoms until 10 days after your last close contact with someone with COVID-19.
  • If you have symptoms, isolate immediately and get tested.

Quarantine in high-risk congregate settings

In certain congregate settings that have high risk of secondary transmission (such as correctional and detention facilities, homeless shelters, or cruise ships), CDC recommends a 10-day quarantine for residents, regardless of vaccination and booster status. During periods of critical staffing shortages, facilities may consider shortening the quarantine period for staff to ensure continuity of operations. Decisions to shorten quarantine in these settings should be made in consultation with state, local, tribal, or territorial health departments and should take into consideration the context and characteristics of the facility. CDC’s setting-specific guidance provides additional recommendations for these settings.Top of Page

Isolation

Isolation is used to separate people with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 from those without COVID-19. People who are in isolation should stay home until it’s safe for them to be around others. At home, anyone sick or infected should separate from others, or wear a well-fitting mask when they need to be around others. People in isolation should stay in a specific “sick room” or area and use a separate bathroom if available. Everyone who has presumed or confirmed COVID-19 should stay home and isolate from other people for at least 5 full days (day 0 is the first day of symptoms or the date of the day of the positive viral test for asymptomatic persons). They should wear a mask when around others at home and in public for an additional 5 days. People who are confirmed to have COVID-19 or are showing symptoms of COVID-19 need to isolate regardless of their vaccination status. This includes:

  • People who have a positive viral test for COVID-19, regardless of whether or not they have symptoms.
  • People with symptoms of COVID-19, including people who are awaiting test results or have not been tested. People with symptoms should isolate even if they do not know if they have been in close contact with someone with COVID-19.

What to do for isolation

  • Monitor your symptoms. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), seek emergency medical care immediately.
  • Stay in a separate room from other household members, if possible.
  • Use a separate bathroom, if possible.
  • Take steps to improve ventilation at home, if possible.
  • Avoid contact with other members of the household and pets.
  • Don’t share personal household items, like cups, towels, and utensils.
  • Wear a well-fitting mask when you need to be around other people.

Learn more about what to do if you are sick and how to notify your contacts.Top of Page

Ending isolation for people who had COVID-19 and had symptoms

If you had COVID-19 and had symptoms, isolate for at least 5 days. To calculate your 5-day isolation period, day 0 is your first day of symptoms. Day 1 is the first full day after your symptoms developed. You can leave isolation after 5 full days.

  • You can end isolation after 5 full days if you are fever-free for 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medication and your other symptoms have improved (Loss of taste and smell may persist for weeks or months after recovery and need not delay the end of isolation​).
  • You should continue to wear a well-fitting mask around others at home and in public for 5 additional days (day 6 through day 10) after the end of your 5-day isolation period. If you are unable to wear a mask when around others, you should continue to isolate for a full 10 days. Avoid people who are immunocompromised or at high risk for severe disease, and nursing homes and other high-risk settings, until after at least 10 days.
  • If you continue to have fever or your other symptoms have not improved after 5 days of isolation, you should wait to end your isolation until you are fever-free for 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medication and your other symptoms have improved. Continue to wear a well-fitting mask. Contact your healthcare provider if you have questions.
  • Do not travel during your 5-day isolation period. After you end isolation, avoid travel until a full 10 days after your first day of symptoms. If you must travel on days 6-10, wear a well-fitting mask when you are around others for the entire duration of travel. If you are unable to wear a mask, you should not travel during the 10 days.
  • Do not go to places where you are unable to wear a mask, such as restaurants and some gyms, and avoid eating around others at home and at work until a full 10 days after your first day of symptoms.

If an individual has access to a test and wants to test, the best approach is to use an antigen test1 towards the end of the 5-day isolation period. Collect the test sample only if you are fever-free for 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medication and your other symptoms have improved (loss of taste and smell may persist for weeks or months after recovery and need not delay the end of isolation). If your test result is positive, you should continue to isolate until day 10. If your test result is negative,  you can end isolation, but continue to wear a well-fitting mask around others at home and in public until day 10. Follow additional recommendations for masking and restricting travel as described above.

1As noted in the labeling for authorized over-the counter antigen testsexternal iconexternal icon: Negative results should be treated as presumptive. Negative results do not rule out SARS-CoV-2 infection and should not be used as the sole basis for treatment or patient management decisions, including infection control decisions. To improve results, antigen tests should be used twice over a three-day period with at least 24 hours and no more than 48 hours between tests.

Note that these recommendations on ending isolation do not apply to people with moderate or severe COVID-19 or with weakened immune systems (immunocompromised). See section below for recommendations for when to end isolation for these groups.

Ending isolation for people who tested positive for COVID-19 but had no symptoms

If you test positive for COVID-19 and never develop symptoms, isolate for at least 5 days. Day 0 is the day of your positive viral test (based on the date you were tested) and day 1 is the first full day after the specimen was collected for your positive test. You can leave isolation after 5 full days.

  • If you continue to have no symptoms, you can end isolation after at least 5 days.
  • You should continue to wear a well-fitting mask around others at home and in public until day 10 (day 6 through day 10). If you are unable to wear a mask when around others, you should continue to isolate for 10 days. Avoid people who are immunocompromised or at high risk for severe disease, and nursing homes and other high-risk settings, until after at least 10 days.
  • If you develop symptoms after testing positive, your 5-day isolation period should start over. Day 0 is your first day of symptoms. Follow the recommendations above for ending isolation for people who had COVID-19 and had symptoms.
  • Do not travel during your 5-day isolation period. After you end isolation, avoid travel until 10 days after the day of your positive test. If you must travel on days 6-10, wear a well-fitting mask when you are around others for the entire duration of travel. If you are unable to wear a mask, you should not travel during the 10 days after your positive test.
  • Do not go to places where you are unable to wear a mask, such as restaurants and some gyms, and avoid eating around others at home and at work until 10 days after the day of your positive test.

If an individual has access to a test and wants to test, the best approach is to use an antigen test1 towards the end of the 5-day isolation period. If your test result is positive, you should continue to isolate until day 10. If your test result is negative, you can end isolation, but continue to wear a well-fitting mask around others at home and in public until day 10. Follow additional recommendations for masking and restricting travel described above.

1As noted in the labeling for authorized over-the counter antigen testsexternal iconexternal icon: Negative results should be treated as presumptive. Negative results do not rule out SARS-CoV-2 infection and should not be used as the sole basis for treatment or patient management decisions, including infection control decisions. To improve results, antigen tests should be used twice over a three-day period with at least 24 hours and no more than 48 hours between tests.

Ending isolation for people who were severely ill with COVID-19 or have a weakened immune system (immunocompromised)

People who are severely ill with COVID-19 (including those who were hospitalized or required intensive care or ventilation support) and people with compromised immune systems might need to isolate at home longer. They may also require testing with a viral test to determine when they can be around others. CDC recommends an isolation period of at least 10 and up to 20 days for people who were severely ill with COVID-19 and for people with weakened immune systems. Consult with your healthcare provider about when you can resume being around other people.

People who are immunocompromised should talk to their healthcare provider about the potential for reduced immune responses to COVID-19 vaccines and the need to continue to follow current prevention measures  (including wearing a well-fitting maskstaying 6 feet apart from others they don’t live with, and avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated indoor spaces) to protect themselves against COVID-19 until advised otherwise by their healthcare provider. Close contacts of immunocompromised people – including household members – should also be encouraged to receive all recommended COVID-19 vaccine doses to help protect these people.

Isolation in high-risk congregate settings

In certain high-risk congregate settings that have high risk of secondary transmission and where it is not feasible to cohort people (such as correctional and detention facilities, homeless shelters, and cruise ships), CDC recommends a 10-day isolation period for residents. During periods of critical staffing shortages, facilities may consider shortening the isolation period for staff to ensure continuity of operations. Decisions to shorten isolation in these settings should be made in consultation with state, local, tribal, or territorial health departments and should take into consideration the context and characteristics of the facility. CDC’s setting-specific guidance provides additional recommendations for these settings.

This CDC guidance is meant to supplement—not replace—any federal, state, local, territorial, or tribal health and safety laws, rules, and regulations.

by Jack Kelly

Two Major Companies Announced Four-Day Workweeks—This May Be The Tipping Point For Businesses To Join The Growing Movement

Insightful author Malcolm Gladwell wrote about how significant change comes all of a sudden, stating, “The tipping point is that magic moment when an idea, trend or social behavior crosses a threshold, tips and spreads like wildfire.” We are starting to see this happen with the four-day workweek movement. Two major companies announced their abbreviated workweek initiatives.

Panasonic Goes For The Three-Day Weekend 

Japan is known to have a hustle-culture work ethic rivaling—if not surpassing—America’s long workdays with fewer days off and family benefits compared to Western Europe. Japan’s “salarymen” are expected to work long hours, including overtime, participate in mandatory after-work activities and prize work above everything else.

In an effort to cut down of the stress of workers, Panasonic, a major Japanese multinational conglomerate company, is offering employees the option of taking a four-day workweek, “freeing them up to take side jobs, volunteer or just relax”—and to also promote retraining, attracting talent and increasing worker productivity and happiness. To provide how revolutionary this new policy is, only 8% of Japanese companies offer more than two guaranteed days off a week, according to the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. 

Microsoft Japan previously experimented with a shorter work program, called “Work-Life Choice Challenge 2019 Summer.” The company gave its 2,300 employees the opportunity to “choose a variety of flexible work styles, according to the circumstances of work and life.” The goal of management was to see if there would be a corresponding increase in productivity and morale when hours are cut down.  

The results of the experiment indicated that workers were happier and there was also a 40% gain in productivity. You may, however, have to question the veracity of the self-reports. Workers may have tried to make the project successful, so that they could have a permanent four-day workweek. The 40% productivity may not be realized once the shortened workweek is officially established and, subsequently, taken for granted.

Why The Shortened Workweek Is Necessary

For decades, we were herded into crowded buses and trains, commuting over two hours a day to get to the office. Once there, you’re stuck in a skyscraper building with windows that are hermetically sealed, blinded by staring at a computer screen for over eight hours under harsh fluorescent lighting. Your micromanaging boss is constantly looking over your shoulder to ensure that you’re working. It’s all about face time and not productivity. To feel important, bosses schedule lots of meetings. There’s a meeting to discuss the upcoming meeting, the meeting itself and then the after-meeting debriefing meeting. This old-school style of working is punishing and exhausting. 

A two-day weekend is not sufficient to recharge after a long, tedious workweek. One day consists of running errands, shopping for groceries, doing the laundry, tending to your children, doing work around the house or yard and the endless list of chores. You’re probably checking Slack and emails and doing catch-up work on Sunday night. Monday morning rolls in and you’re still exhausted. 

The 4-Day Week Global grassroots nonprofit organization launched a mission to champion the four-day workweek. The movement was started by Andrew Barnes and Charlotte Lockhart. Barnes started this work style for his New Zealand-based company, Perpetual Guardian, and saw that it was very successful. Productivity increased and stress declined. 

Barnes and his partner, Lockhart, decided to share their story and help other companies initiate their own four-day workweek, which would “improve business productivity, worker health outcomes, stronger families and communities, challenge the gender equality issue and work toward a more sustainable work environment.” 

They found that 63% of businesses found it easier to attract and retain talent with a four-day week. Around 78% of employees with four-day weeks are happier and less stressed.” They’ve been providing online advice and guidance for companies that are considering starting their own pilot programs for a shortened workweek.

Bolting To An Abbreviated Workweek

The second company, which recently concluded a successful four-day workweek is Bolt, a fast-growing fintech unicorn. Ryan Breslow, the young founder and CEO of Bolt, joined the four-day workweek movement. Breslow, heading a multibillion dollar tech company, is wagering a big bet on the belief that by taking good care of his team, they’ll happily outperform. 

The idea is to have his team work only four days a week. There are no catches. The checkout technology company founder subscribes to the notion that by providing time away from the office to rest and recuperate, people will return to work with greater energy and enthusiasm. They won’t be like the “zombies” you see at the office or on Zoom video calls, dragging themselves through the work day due to exhaustion. 

Breslow posed the question, “What if we worked like lions?” Like the king of the jungle, people can operate with “short bursts of energy, high intensity and then rest and recover for the next sprint.” With a four-day workweek, he believes employees will have more energy and become much more productive. “With a four-day workweek, we can feel confident going all in on those four days. We can truly give it our all.” 

Instead of playing the game, watching the clock tick down to 5 p.m., when you could dash out of the building or log off the computer at home, results are more important than face time. He says about this business philosophy, “High performance isn’t about how much you put in; it’s how much you get out.”  

Boston Boat Reservation Company Is On Board

One Boston-based company is paving the way for companies to start adopting the four-day workweek. Over a year ago, Dockwa, the top boating reservation app that helps boaters secure slips and moorings at over 800 marinas nationwide, introduced the four-day workweek model to its company. Instead of the expected Friday off, CEO Mike Melillo selected Monday as the day off, a change that does not impact employee pay, time off or the hours they need to work.

The Wanderlust Group is the team behind Dockwa, Marinas.com and Campouts. It builds marketplaces and technology platforms that connect adventurers to destinations and helps those destinations grow. Its apps and software are used by more than 250,000 people, across 15,000 destinations in more than 30 countries. The Wanderlust Group is also a remote-first company that operates on a four-day workweek.

Dockwa is a two-sided marketplace connecting boaters and marinas. Through Dockwa, marinas can run their entire operation while gaining access to the hundreds of thousands of boaters using our free reservation app. Boaters can more quickly find and book both long-term and transient slips spending less time planning and more out on the water. Dockwa’s four-day workweek policy increased profits 121% year-over-year in 2020 and employees became increasingly more productive and happier at work.

During the time off, Dockwa encourages its employees to step away from their work and use the extra time off to invest in themselves, their family or friends. From earning a pilot’s license to volunteering at a nonprofit sailing club, to having a dedicated day for parent-teacher conferences and appointments, the stories of how employees have used this time back are both diverse and powerful. “We wanted to combat employee burnout. We realized that the state of the world was changing, and we really wanted to make sure that our employees were present, that they remained happy,” said Jessica Palmer, vice-president of people operations.

Elephants Remember That They Need A Break

Elephant Ventures offered a four-day workweek, but with a twist. The company requires 10-hour days, four days a week and then three days off. Barnes and Lockhart advocate for not increasing the daily hours to offset the day off. It seems that companies are making their own tailored versions of the program.

Art Shectman is founder and president of Elephant Ventures, a digital innovation and agile/lean product development and engineering firm based in New York City. He’s also the cofounder and president of Ultranauts, a social impact firm that employs individuals with autism, as quality engineers for software testing and data quality analysis work. 

His hands-on engineering experience spans the technology landscape, from artificially intelligent robots to high-security trading networks, cryptocurrency trading automation to giant billboards in Times Square and green vending-machine prototypes. Shectman has consulted at the executive level for Fortune 1000 companies. 

Shectman noticed that during the virus outbreak, his staff, affectionately called “phunts,” wrestled with maintaining a break between work and living a well-rounded life. He notices some signs of burnout, challenges and struggling with morale. 

His Manila-based team works a four-day workweek, and they had 20 to 30% increases in productivity. In response, the tech CEO decided to do what he does for his clients. The company held an all-hands evaluation of what work style would work best in this new and uncertain time period. He repositioned his U.S. workforce to a fully distributed work style and converted to a four-day workweek. 

It took employees about three to four weeks to adjust, he said.After the first three-day weekend, workers returned feeling rested and excited. “By the third week, it was more routine. People were really starting to have adventures and plan ahead and leverage to make use of the three-day weekend.” Ultimately, the compressed workweek was well received, so much so that the company adopted the schedule permanently.

Employees can make up hourson Fridays or the weekend, if they aren’t able to get in their hours in four days. “We trust people to fill in the gaps if they missed hours,” Shectman said. Employees will have 10-hour days, Monday through Thursday. “Everyone came back refreshed. That extra day, everyone took a pause. You could feel it in company morale. Everyone was more productive and engaged.”

Uncharted Territory

Banks Benetiz is the CEO of Uncharted, a venture capital firm that accelerates early-stage solutions addressing economic inequality. Benetiz converted to a four-day week in 2020.

One of the benefits of an abbreviated week is that managers and workers need to be in the moment and highly focus on the present. It makes people analyze what is actually important.

He said, “When we launched an experiment during the summer to try out a four-day workweek, everyone’s salary stayed the same. But our team worked 32 hours every week between June 1 and August 28, taking every Friday off. This was not four 10-hour days. This was four eight-hour days. The experiment tested the hypothesis that we can deliver 100% of the work at 80% of the time, while increasing team mental health, reducing team stress and maintaining team culture and cohesion.”

Benetiz added, “We hypothesized that a person’s sense of support from their co-workers might drop slightly because everyone was so focused on their priorities, but we saw the opposite. Work-life balance increased and work stress decreased.”

One of the concerns about the four-day workweek was that the culture would suffer. The data showed that the team’s sense of culture remained unchanged compared to baseline data before the experiment.  

Team members reported that while workweeks felt intense, having an extra day off resulted in greater energy at the start of the workweek. In addition, because team members have more time to spend with friends, family and their own interests, some have reported that they feel the team is doing better at bringing their whole selves into the workplace.

Spain, Iceland, Scotland And The U.S.

Scotland launched a trial four-day workweek. The decision was the culmination of a campaign promise made by the ruling Scottish National Party. Workers will have their hours reduced by 20%, but won’t suffer any loss in compensation. The program will be funded by the SNP with a £10 million fund ($13.8 million). The monies will be used to experiment with the abbreviated workweek. Some Scottish businesses have already started their own truncated workweeks. 

Spain had announced that it would run a trial four-day workweek. The Spanish government agreed to a 32-hour workweek over three years without cutting workers’ compensation. The pilot program, similar to what Scotland is doing, intends to reduce employers’ risk by having the government make up the difference in salary when workers switch to a four-day schedule.

Scotland pointed to Iceland and its strong results as a big reason for taking a chance with the four-day workweek. A recent study of 2,500 workers in Iceland, more than 1% of the workforce, was conducted to see if shortened work days lead to more productivity and a happier workforce. The trials were made across an array of different types of workplaces. 

Between 2015 and 2019, Iceland conducted test cases of a 35- to 36-hour workweeks, without any calls for a commensurate cut in pay. To ensure quality control, the results were analyzed by Autonomy and the Association for Sustainability and Democracy. Based upon the stellar results,  Icelandic trade unions negotiated for a reduction in working hours. The study also led to a significant change in Iceland, nearly 90% of the working population now have reduced hours or other accommodations. Worker stress and burnout lessened. There was an improvement in work-life balance. 

New Four-Day Workweek Bill Brought To Congress

Recently, Democratic Congressman Mark Takano introduced legislation that would reduce the standard workweek from 40 hours to 32 hours. Takano said in a press release, “A shorter workweek would benefit both employers and employees alike.” Takano added, “Pilot programs run by governments and businesses across the globe have shown promising results, as productivity climbed and workers reported better work-life balance, less need to take sick days, heightened morale and lower childcare expenses because they had more time with their family and children.”

The congressman said, “Shorter workweeks have also been shown to further reduce healthcare premiums for employers, lower operational costs for businesses and have a positive environmental impact in some of these studies.” Takano asserts that the workers would benefit from this change, as his proposal will allow nonexempt employees to receive overtime compensation for any hours worked over 32 hours. 

A shortened workweek would go a long way in helping people lead a better balance of work and life. We’ll also likely see pushes for five-hour workdays, staggered flexible work arrangements, more people choosing remote-work options, hybrid models and other programs. Companies will benefit, as they’ll have a happier workforce that’s appreciative and motivated. Employees who are treated well will likely work harder, which would enhance productivity and profits. 

Here are some other company piloting or contemplating starting a four-day workweek:

  • CULTIQUE – cultural insights and strategy venture
  • Healthwise – nonprofit leader in providing evidence-based health education
  • Advanced RV – builder of custom Mercedes-Benz motorhomes
  • Floodlight Invest – ESG data provider to asset managers
  • Seed&Spark – film-centric crowdfunding and SVOD platform
  • Gillespie Hall PR – strategic public relations, branding, social media and marketing firm
  • Kickstarter – platform for funding creative projects

One of the great things we’ve seen come out of the horribleness of the pandemic is the optimism for change, particularly as it relates to workers. In this competitive job market, battles are waged by businesses to find potential employees and Herculean efforts are made to keep them happy. We’ve seen millions of Americans quit their jobs each month, showing that they won’t accept bad bosses, disrespect and low wages. 

To remain competitive, companies have become open-minded to offering innovative ways to improve the quality of their workers’ lives. The four-day workweek is part of an overall reset of the workplace. We’re also seeing employee empowerment with the rapid growth of remote, hybrid and flexible (work anywhere or anytime you want) models, along with staggered hours to help with childcare, and encouraging relocations from high-cost cities to lower cost locations for the same pay and digital nomads traveling the world and operating from beaches, ski resorts and exotic places around the world.

Jack Kelly

Care might’ve forgotten about New Orleans, but crime sure has not. The city achieved a recent high for murders last year. The number was 218. That was the most murders since pre-Katrina. What a generational achievement. You would think it would be marked and analyzed with as much hoopla as the other deplorable statistics the city is known for. Instead, the most prominent recognition of this accomplishment was noteworthy for the wrong reasons. It was the sound of semiautomatic rifles echoing shots through the air on New Years Eve night.

Over at the D.A.’s office

As the New Year rang in, D.A.Jason Williams was patting himself on the back. As he would tell any reporter, successfully implementing his soft on crime strategy  was a cause for celebration. It’s the beginning of a transformational approach to dealing with crime in the city. His critics are not amused. Criminals, they say, will not be prosecuted and given stiff life learning sentences. Thy are now being released with a fist bump and nod before safely returning to terrorize the streets. Victimized citizens, they say, are urged patience while this benevolently counterintuitive approach bears fruit. Meanwhile, a new sheriff is in town, vowing to team up with Williams and reduce the prison population.

Over at the NOPD

Citizens discuss what happened

The perpetually understaffed NOPD haplessly patrols the streets. For the low low price of $194 million a year, it offers to provide minimal protection against crime while ensuring that no innocent black man will ever be shot, killed, or knelt on under its watch. It achieves this via an apparent hands-off approach to crime.

For example, citizens can attend a major sporting event downtown. We park our cars a mile from the 6th District station on MLK. Then we return to find our windows busted and any goods inside stolen. If one were to ask where the NOPD was when all this was going down, the most logical reply would be: “beats the hell out of me,” or “probably up the street.” Apparently, the unspoken motto is: no justice, no civil rights law suits.

And the outgoing Council says…nothing

With murders and shootings on the rise, and citizens riding around at night in search of a safe place to park or pump gas, candidates for the City Council collectively campaigned on a slogan of See No Crime, Hear No Crime. Meeting violence with silence, the candidates decided to get tough on Entergy and the S&WB instead. Yes, even though you now stand a higher chance of being shot or murdered, you can rest assured knowing that the Council is fighting to make sure you have more money to pay for your funeral or hospital bills via lower rates for electricity and water.

The Mayor’s like, What Crime?

The mayor, for her part, made it a priority not to make crime a priority during her campaign. The 12 other people running against her didn’t either. Since her landslide victory, Mayor Cantrell has been out and about vowing to be tough on COVID and Mardi Gras. Despite a highly contagious virus spinning variants like 45s and the murder rate off to a rip-roaring start, carnival will be televised. It marks a return to normal for New Orleans. Citizens must take the necessary precautions of course. Proper protection includes masks, hand sanitizer, Clorox wipes, and a healthy amount of Kevlar.

And then the youth

Meanwhile we are now on the umpteenth generation of black kids left to roam the city with nothing to do. With their most likely immediate career path leading to bartender or waiter, kids observe the lay of the land and choose to hustle on the streets instead.  Cycles of City Council representatives have brought little investment to their communities. To this day, you’re still more likely to find a 40 ounce in stores in black neighborhoods as opposed to an apple or a book.

Supplying kids with blight, bad diets, and midnight basketball has done little to curb crime throughout the years. And since there’s no sign of them  pulling themselves up by their often missing bootstraps, this violent crime surge will probably be the new norm, just like COVID.

And with that, Happy New Year, people.

Our annual look back at the previous stories that were most impactful last year.  These stories got the most hits on our website.  The ranking is based upon what you like and read the most.  In order they are:

10.  Why Men Cheat Might Surprise You.  by Love Dr. Rob

                Love Dr. Rob offers monthly articles with realistic and compelling relationship advice.  His top story last year was also the 10th most popular article on the site.  According to his article on cheating Wait a minute sir, did he say his reason was her?  Yes, you heard what I said. He was a good dude, but his girlfriend wasn’t giving him what he needs. She wasn’t doing what the other women were doing. So, because of that, he had to cheat to get what he wasn’t getting from her.

9. Vaccines Roll Out Nationwide & Mask Mandates

                Legendary local writer CC Campbell Rock submitted a compelling piece about the politization of mask mandates.  She submitted a photo of former Republican stalwart and Trump loyalist Herman Cain. He sat unmasked at a Trump rally.  Shortly after he died from COVID complications.  Her informative read is entitled Just Wear the Damn Mask.

8. Mardi Gras, second lines and festivals canceled

                He is sometimes acerbic but always funny.  Kenneth Cooper’s article about the political and social fallout of Mayor LaToya Cantrell canceling Mardi Gras was number 8.  He neatly wove o=in the NYX All Lives Matter Controversy.  Funny and informative, this article by Cooper helped sooth the wound of no Mardi Gras.

7. Covid and Sports

                Kenneth Cooper also submitted the 7th most popular story last year.  The effect of COVID on sports and the Saints made the season challenging.  Both the NFL and the NBA created COVID protocols.  Daily testing and transparency on results highlighted the procedures.  Teams saw coaches and players become ineligible weekly.  The Saints and Pelicans saw their share of problems

6. COVID and Education

                CC Campbell Rock wrote a compelling piece on education.  Our 7th most popular article questioned the need for charter schools. “Are charter schools actually good? Or should they be closed? When Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards signs Louisiana Senate Bill 95 into law this month, the Orleans Parish School Board will regain legislative power stripped from the elected body 15 years ago by legislators and state education officials. In New Orleans maybe we will get to answer the questions.”

5. Hurricane Ida

                My article about our response to Hurricane Ida is number 5.  The devastation provided an opportunity for local businesses to grow.  New Orleanians should hire local contractors to rebuild their properties.  City government should incentivize locals and support local contractors with access to capital and training.  It still matters. Read it here.  

4. January 6th Events at Capital

                CC Campbell Rock immediately reported on the attack on our capital.  And she was one of the first to out Donald Rouse and his participation in the attack.  Pictures show the attack that new Lost Cause is not redeemable.  Despite the claims of to the contrary, this protest was based on lies and misinformation.  Read her detailed analysis.

3. Election of Susan Hutson & Oliver Thomas

                The new progressive political shift turned into a tidal wave after the past election.  New Orleanians elected two reform candidates.  Susan Hutson defeated a New Orleans institution, Sheriff Marlon Gusman and Oliver Thomas defeated incumbent Council Member Cyndi Nguyen.  Read my articles about there campaigns here and here.

2. State Police Exposed in Ronald Green’s death

                The shocking betrayal of the public trust is astonishing.  Police murdering an unarmed black man is not a news flash.  Even police covering up their misdeeds is kinda’ ho-hum. But the depths of the corruption is remarkable.  CC Campbell Rock’s incredible piece shows “We are paying police to kill us!”

1. Bayou Phoenix Awarded to Troy Henry group

                Troy Henry’s defeat of Drew Brees is one for the ages. Not only did the local businessman present a better proposal than the future Hall of Fame QB, but he galvanized community support after it looked like the fix was  in in NO East.  We ran several articles about the process.  Combined they represent the most popular stories of the year.  Read them here and here and here.

I’m relieved that arespectable judge like Lafayette’s Michelle Odinet only thinks of black people as n*ggers and roaches when she’s high on sedatives. Otherwise, we’d have a problem. To know that her unconscious racism can only be unearthed by a mind-altering substance restores all the faith I lost in her humanity and her judicial skills when I first heard the news.  Despite all observable evidence, finally it’s settled. She’s not a racist, after all. She was just sedated. Thank goodness she cleared that up.

Sedatives – The New Defense for Racism

People still have doubts, though. But that’s because they don’t understand that sometimes sedatives can have reverse effects. In her case, instead of making her drowsy or subdued, this sedative left her euphoric. I mean, did you see the video? There she was sitting there giggling and pointing. She called a black man a n*igger. Then she equated n*ggers and roaches (purely against her will of course). She and her kids cackled at a home surveillance video of a black man. They said he tried to break into their house.

Her poor inner spirit. It must’ve short circuited in shame at being outed like this. That would explain why she blacked out and has no recollection of what happened. Now with all said and done, she asks for our prayers and forgiveness.

LSU is not as forgiving, though. Odinet’s son was also in the video pointing, giggling, and dropping the n-word. LSU immediately kicked him off the track team. They didn’t even consider whether the sedative was an airborne contagion or not. How else could you explain that everybody else, except the person recording, was just as giddy as Odinet. Talk about a rush to judgement.

I wonder what the Louisiana Supreme Court thinks of all this. I mean she did kind of unconsciously break at least 2 cannons of the judicial code when she was high on this sedative. Canon 1 talks about observing “high standards of conduct so that the integrity and independence of the judiciary may be preserved.” Well, she kind of knocked that right out the park. And Canon 2 talks about acting “at all times in a manner that promotes public confidence in the integrity and impartiality of the judiciary.”  And another homerun. It’s hard to not imagine that when a black man is in her court she doesn’t unconsciously see a n*gger or a roach. One can only guess what the future holds.

Nationwide Tour Possible

I wonder if in the coming days former President Trump will grant her the Presidential Very Fine Person Medal of Freedom. It would be well deserved. Maybe she’ll even step down from the bench and go on a series of nationwide speaking tours. Out on tour, she can use her unfortunate experience as a call to action against the oncoming sedative epidemic. After all, who knows how many other white women across the country are in danger of being exposed.

When the news broke, I know what you were thinking. Like me, you missed the good ole days when racist white people used to loudly call us monkeys and tell us to go the f—back to Africa.  Yeah I know, they clearly had no clue of evolutionary theory and possessed lazy geographical skills.  But at least back then they still thought of us as fellow primates. We were lesser primates of course, but still sentient beings capable of producing thought and emotion. But now, in these nouveau 3rd wave racism days, all it takes is a mild sedative and a judge like Odinet is taking even that semblance of humanity away from us. In her claimed sedated state, we’re just insects devoid of humanity only fit to be gassed with insecticide or wiped from the bottom of her shoe.

All I can say is give her a break. It’ll be a hard holiday season ahead for the Odinet family. Hopefully, the Louisiana Judiciary Commission and Supreme Court are quick to act. In the end, doesn’t her privilege at least afford her that?

A Collection of Political Cartoons by John Slade
























































































See the video below








































Now We Execute Correction

 by TiOnka Writez


The fight against systemic, academic, and institutional racism heavily affects Black, Brown, and Indigenous people worldwide. However, there is a beacon of hope. Thanks to the efforts of civil rights leaders, activists, participants, allies, and members of The International Tribunal on Human Rights Abuse organization. In October of 2021, the United States stood in defense of the following charges: (1) police killings, (2) mass incarceration, (3) political prisoners/ prisoners of war, (4) environmental racism, and (5) public health inequities against Black, Brown, and Indigenous people. The jurist of the three-day trial proceeding found the United States guilty of all charges.


Today, information is more easily accessible than ever before, creating greater exposure to malicious acts. Let us consider, for example, the poor treatment of women of color—a demographic which is consistently the most neglected group of individuals worldwide. For instance, Ms. Sarah Baartman; her brain, skeleton, and sexual organs were on exhibit in a Paris Museum from 1815 to 1974. Or the case of Ms. Henrietta Lacks. In 1951, medical professionals extracted cancerous cells from Ms. Lacks without her consent. Ms. Lacks posthumous service is why the healthcare industry is making history by generating the world’s first immortalized human cell line.

Also, we have Ms. Mary Turner, who, in 1918 at eight months pregnant, was lynched, and her fetus cut from her belly. Fast-forwarding to the present is the story of Sandra Bland. Ms. Bland met her end while in the custody of Waller County, TX., in 2015. Breonna Taylor was murdered by Louisville, Kentucky police in 2020. In that same year, more than 100,000 black women and girls went missing. Only hundreds of the cases received media coverage or resulted in a cheerful ending.

Police Killings

Cases such as Treyvon Martin, Eric Garner, Aubrey Taylor, and many others dominate the airwaves. Family members, friends, and even strangers are on the streets of their respective cities crying out for refuge and resources. Each case is a painful reminder of the current state of affairs for African Americans. Each story serves to remind everyone of the hazy overcast in the lives of the Black and Indigenous People of Color (BIPOC) community.

Remediation and Reparations


The United States can best prove good on its premise of unity and justice for all through actions. The primary agenda now is remediation ideas, reparations, and future activities, considering the “guilty” verdict. A thoughtful recommendation is to amend the US Constitution. Revising the constitution to acknowledge Black, Brown, and Indigenous people as “human” improves society.  No longer can people treat BIPOC as undeserving of basic fundamental human rights. But changing the constitution is challenging. Especially in today’s political climate.

In the interim, a gesture of goodwill for the contributions of Black, Brown, and Indigenous people is a Presidential executive order. The people are worthy of an executive order promoting equity, justice, and opportunity.

Is new love the truest form of love?

By Kimberly Key

How many people wish the initial rush of “being in love” could last? While some may dismiss these feelings as infatuation or human evolution’s way of baiting people to procreate and perpetuate the species, others suggest that the first stages of love might represent its truest expression. Bruce Lipton, author of The Biology of Belief and The Honeymoon Effect, maintains that the initial feelings of falling in love yank people from their self-obsessive autopilot-driven thoughts and behaviors and drop them into the beautiful, magic moment.

A person newly in love sees the other as flawless, and all of their idiosyncrasies as precious and adorable. Empathy, compassion, communication, and understanding are at an all-time high. Moreover, the love gets transferred onto other areas of life, so the world seems brighter; sunsets are more radiant, and the wind feels like magic pixie dust connecting every living organism. While the modern world tends to dismiss the first blush of love as comparable to a drug-induced high that cannot be trusted, Lipton believes that new love may be the more authentic love as it serves as a wakeup call to the genuine experience of the world—and falling out of love means a person is falling back into their unconscious conditioned habits that are largely filled with negative perceptions.

Thus, the beloved who was once charming becomes annoying and the dancing butterfly that once seemed to perform a ballet in synchronization to a divinely orchestrated symphony of nature sounds now appears like a pesky pest, if it’s noticed at all.

Interestingly, researchers have found that the most positive feeling that reduces inflammatory and disease-causing chemicals in the body is the state of awe—and awe feelings appear to be a component of first love. For people in love, and in a state of awe, awe can feel like gratitude on steroids—but without the drugs. In fact, drugs and mind-altering chemicals like alcohol actually get in the way of experiencing awe states. So do distractions like the internet and cell phones. Perhaps that’s why new love feels so freeing: It rescues the person from a self-imprisoned mundane existence that is not fully conscious. Love brings a person back to life, like breathing into the lungs does after the rescue of a drowning person.

How does one sustain love?

1. Try to keep seeing the person with new eyes. Be mindful when you are projecting your feelings onto a partner—like being critical of them when, in reality, it’s your own self-critic that beats you up and is now beating on them. Seeing the person with new eyes can help one to be a better listener and to appreciate that everything about that person is special.

2. Being in love means practicing intimacy. Intimacy has been described as “into-me-see” and can feel sacred between people. When people are mutually intimate, research shows they have better quality of life, longer and healthier lives, increased immune functioning, improved memory, heightened creativity—and more experience of awe states. Intimacy means listening fully to someone’s heart and deepest feelings and sharing your heart and deepest feelings. Intimacy means trying to listen and understand when someone is hurt, and working through conflict with each other in ways that honor and respect the relationship. Also intimacy means hanging in there and building mutual trust, safety, and heart-to-heart resonance. Intimacy means having self-awareness and decreased defensiveness. And intimacy does not seek to harm, punish, blame, attack, condemn, or criticize. It is not abusive; it is therapeutic.

3. Being in love means keeping the adventure alive. Working together to give to and uplift others is an important form of being in love. Many couples have children and grandchildren and tend to see the fruits of their love as something larger than themselves. Being in love means a loss of selfishness, pride, and ego. It seeks to make the world a little better and brighter for others. Being in love is humble and, temporally, exists in the right here, right now. Being in love is a state of mind that can include a specific beloved or become a state of living you can adopt in every moment.

How can we make our city better this year?

 New Orleanians are embarking upon a drastic shift.  Our city is changing for the better.  We are in the midst of a progressive movement.  We are starting to invest in our people.  New Orleans can only get better if all boats rise.  How can we make our city better?  We must invest in all of our people.

For years we saw mass incarceration, poor education, limited job opportunities and a gotcha style of governance. But now the city is implementing new fresh policies.  And these policies can make poor people’s lives better. And that is great for all of us. Progressive policies like decriminalizing marijuana possession mean people can continue to work and support their families.  In addition to policies, citizens elected new progressive leaders – like Oliver Thomas.  Combining fresh ideas with brave new leaders pushes New Orleans to the forefront of positive change.

Home Ownership is the Key

But the most important idea to implement is home ownership.  Transforming our city from a city of renters is critical.  And home ownership is the most significant change that must happen.  Homeowners commit 85% fewer crimes than renters.  Homeowners are employed and busy.  They are contributors to the tax structure the city depends upon.  Creating homeowners must be the next step in the evolution of our city.  Homeownership is the panacea.

But transforming renters to homeowners is a monumental task.  Many come from generational renter families.  These families have less net worth and are financially uneducated. Also they  tend to only have a high school diploma or less and remain unmarried. So an educational plan surrounding the benefits of homeownership is key.

Development Ideas

  Our new city council can be the bully pulpit.  “Improvements and opportunities” is the simple message.  Because our entire city, region and state improves when New Orleans improves all of us must invest in New Orleans. New Orleans improves when we transform to a city of homeowners.  Increased home ownership means:

  • Increased property tax collections
  • Crime reduction
  • Cleaner neighborhoods
  • Improved housing stock
  • More park utilization
  • Better schools
  • Better streets
  • End to the cycle of poverty
  • More state resources

Necessary Steps

  So, skills development is critical.  In order to own a home, each person needs a marketable skill that pays a mortgage wage.  A living wage is for renters.  We have to set higher goals.  To create a mortgage wage, people have to like what they do.  We must:

  • Identify likes, desires, natural capacities and experience
  • Pair people with businesses
  • Utilize Library millage funds to provide paid training
  • Provide soft second mortgages
  • Provide credit classes
  • Stop city implemented credit dings

Opportunities development

  • Contract preferences for participating businesses
  • Matchmaking small businesses with large businesses
  • Contract preferences for businesses in program
  • Matchmaking small businesses with large businesses
  • SWB, Entergy, cell phone companies minimum requirements
  • NOPD and Sheriffs jobs

Loan Availability

  • Credit building and understanding
  • Soft seconds
  • Public banks scoring system

Benefits

  • 85% don’t commit crimes
  • Increased property taxes
  • Improved housing stock
  • Crime reduction
  • A great place to raise a family

To be better we have to do better.  Let’s do better in 2022